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of the substance of the proposal, it's too big. there is no time to get something this big done before the august 2 deadline. it literally cannot be passed through the senate in time even if everybody likes it. the other rainbow/sunshine problem here is the president and the senate agreeing on this or anything doesn't get you further towards raising the debt ceiling, it's not just the president and the senate, it's crazy town down the hallway too, it's john boehner's republican house, that likes the idea of the nation defaulting, that thinks the explosion of the economy might be pretty or at least warm for a second. they are not looking for a good deal or achieve particular policy objectives, regardless of what they get, they are not going to vote to raise the debt ceiling. the republicans who are running for president from the house of representatives, for example, are not saying don't raise the debt ceiling unless, don't raise the debt ceiling until, they are saying don't raise the debt ceiling at all. let's see what happens. this is how republican congresswoman michele bachmann's first president
is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress, i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at;h$ow different washington, d.c. operated than every other business in america, where most american businesses make the hard choices of paying their bills and living within their means, in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested business as usual. he had another routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. he was a president asking for the largest debt increase in history on the heels of the largest spending increase in history. here's what we got from that massive spending binge, a new health care bill most americans didn't ask for, a new spending bill that's more useful for producing material for late night comedians than jobs, and a debt that sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united states cannot default on its debt limitations. what we told the president in january was this, the american
're going to see something between the reid and boehnor plans, the big difference is the boehnor plan forces us to raise the debt ceiling again and forces us to accept a $1.8 trillion or more in cuts from the so-called super commission, and if we don't do it, we go through another crises. also a vote on the budget amendment. i think you could get something more rationalal to incentivize another plan down the road and have something with enough pressure coming from the markets, both parties could vote for. >> you make it sound like if reasonable people had a conversation about this there might actually be a solution, so thanks for being on and talking with us today. >> glad to be here. >> that was ezra klein, columnist for "the washington post" and bloomberg and also an msnbc policy analyst. thanks so much. >> thank you. >> now, ask yourself, would you -- no, not you, nancy. would you want john boehner's job right now, trying to placate a gaggle of angry tea partiers and stave off an economic calamity at the same time? i suspect there are moments even he doesn't want this job, but it. >> ( ro
, the smaller the people. and right now we have a government so big and so expensive it is zapping the drive out of our people and keeping our economy from running at full capacity. the solution to this crisis is not complicated. if you are spending more than you are taking in, you need to spend less of it. there's no symptom of government more menacing than our debt. break its grip and we begin to liberate our economy and our future. we're up to the task. and i hope president obama will join us in this work. god blets you and your family and god bless the united states of america. >> that was speaker of the house john boehner responding to the speak address of the president of the united states. called a stalemate over the debt ceiling negotiations. speaker boehnor said there was no stalemate, making the case that there was no stalemate simply because he has been able to pass some bills in the house of representatives only that address this with absolutely no possibility of passing that legislation through the united states senate. ignoring the stalemate, he ignored many of the specifics raised
and had to do them later. this is another leader who made a big show of imposing new rules for the house, that every time they'd propose spending they'd have to propose cutting to offset, then with the very first bill he introduces, he violates his own rule. this is the house speaker who does photo-ops like this one. >> when we say we're going to cut spending, this is what we're doing, heard saying to himself i can't believe i just said that. again, it's his own press conference. nobody said mr. speaker, can we read your lips on this? he brought it up, repeating the most famous republican screw up line in the last 40 years, unforced error, own goal again. here he is on fox news last night talking about the need to raise the debt ceiling. >> so what is next? what if you don't get a deal? >> i don't know. >> third in line to the presidency, speaker of the house. dunno. whether or not you agree with john boehner on policy, whether or not you think john boehner on policy is right or wrong, whether or not you want him to succeed politically or you don't want him to succeed politically, john b
ceiling, we can get through default, it won't be a big deal. now, john boehner doesn't believe that, mitch mcconnell doesn't believe that, but boehnor seems unable to move toward any kind of agreement, partly because he's worried about his own fate in this caucus or he's worried that if he puts together a deal that is supported by too many democrats and not enough republicans, he's also threatened. so i think it's that internal politics in the republican caucus that's blocking this. i think what might happen is that mitch mcconnell may decide to let harry reid pass his plan without threatening a filibuster. now, if he did that, the democrats could get it through with a majority. that's how most democracies do things, but not our senate, and that may set up grounds for a solution. that's about the only thing i could see right now that might begin to get us out of this or at least begin real negotiations again. >> so, speaking of that, of the idea there is, in fact, a majority rule, and that there's so much politics going on here, look, we saw this reuters poll indicating a majority of voter
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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